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Byron Leigh Hatch @ team Carl Sagan
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Message 10066 - Posted: 25 Oct 2010, 12:37:10 UTC

P ≠ NP? It's bad news for the power of computing

Has the biggest question in computer science been solved? On 6 August, Vinay Deolalikar, a mathematician at Hewlett-Packard Labs in Palo Alto, California, sent out draft copies of a paper titled simply "P ≠ NP".

This terse assertion could have profound implications for the ability of computers to solve many kinds of problem. It also answers one of the Clay Mathematics Institute's seven Millennium Prize problems, so if it turns out to be correct Deolalikar will have earned himself a prize of $1 million.

The P versus NP question concerns the speed at which a computer can accomplish a task such as factorising a number. Some tasks can be completed reasonably quickly – in technical terms, the running time is proportional to a polynomial function of the input size – and these tasks are in class P.

read more here ...

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19287-p--np-its-bad-news-for-the-power-of-computing.html?utm_source=KurzweilAI+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=9d93c5f400-UA-946742-1&utm_medium=email
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn19287-p--np-its-bad-news-for-the-power-of-computing.html?utm_source=KurzweilAI+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=9d93c5f400-UA-946742-1&utm_medium=email

Byron Leigh Hatch @ team Carl Sagan
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Message 10077 - Posted: 26 Oct 2010, 13:02:13 UTC

Scientists in China have succeeded in teleporting information between photons further than ever before. They have transported quantum information over a free space distance of 16 km (10 miles), much further than the few hundred meters previously achieved, which brings us closer to transmitting information over long distances without the need for a traditional signal.

Quantum teleportation is not the same as the teleportation most of us know from science fiction, where an object (or person) in one place is “beamed up” to another place where a perfect copy is replicated. In quantum teleportation two photons or ions (for example) are entangled in such a way that when the quantum state of one is changed the state of the other also changes, as if the two were still connected. This enables quantum information to be teleported if one of the photons/ions is sent some distance away.

In previous experiments the photons were confined to fiber channels a few hundred meters long to ensure their state remained unchanged, but in the new experiments pairs of photons were entangled and then the higher-energy photon of the pair was sent through a free space channel 16 km long. The researchers, from the University of Science and Technology of China and Tsinghua University in Beijing, found that even at this distance the photon at the receiving end still responded to changes in state of the photon remaining behind. The average fidelity of the teleportation achieved was 89 percent.

The distance of 16 km is greater than the effective aerosphere thickness of 5-10 km, so the group's success could pave the way for experiments between a ground station and a satellite, or two ground stations with a satellite acting as a relay. This means quantum communication applications could be possible on a global scale in the near future.

The public free space channel was at ground level and spanned the 16 km distance between Badaling in Beijing (the teleportation site) and the receiver site at Huailai in Hebei province. Entangled photon pairs were generated at the teleportation site using a semiconductor, a blue laser beam, and a crystal of beta-barium borate (BBO). The pairs of photons were entangled in the spatial modes of photon 1 and polarization modes of photon 2. The research team designed two types of telescopes to serve as optical transmitting and receiving antennas.

The experiments confirm the feasibility of space-based quantum teleportation, and represent a giant leap forward in the development of quantum communication applications.

Read more here ...

http://www.physorg.com/news193551675.html
http://www.physorg.com/news193551675.html

The paper is available in full online at Nature Photonics.

More information: Xian-Min Jin, Experimental free-space quantum teleportation, Nature Photonics, Published online:
16 May 2010. doi:10.1038/nphoton.2010.87

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Message 10078 - Posted: 26 Oct 2010, 14:23:40 UTC

Interesting stuff!

Byron Leigh Hatch @ team Carl Sagan
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Message 10079 - Posted: 26 Oct 2010, 15:24:39 UTC

thank you Slicker

CUDA SPOTLIGHT

Dell published a new paper titled "Expanding the Boundaries of GPU Computing," which includes a case study about the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois. The case study describes Lincoln - a 47 TFLOPS cluster based on Dell hardware with NVIDIA Tesla GPUs for parallel processing. NCSA’s John Towns says that NCSA is seeing "applications that on a per-GPU basis have an equivalent performance of anywhere from 30 to 40 CPU cores all the way up to over 200 CPU cores…."

read more here ...

http://www.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/power/en/gpu_computing?c=us&l=en&cs=555
http://www.dell.com/content/topics/global.aspx/power/en/gpu_computing?c=us&l=en&cs=555

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Message 10081 - Posted: 27 Oct 2010, 5:38:22 UTC

Chinese Chip Closes In on Intel, AMD

China may finally have a processor to power a homegrown supercomputer.

By Christopher Mims

At this year's Hot Chips conference at Stanford University, Weiwu Hu, the lead architect of the "national processor" of China, revealed three new chip designs. One of them could enable China to build a homegrown supercomputer to rank in a prestigious list of the world's fastest machines.

The Loongson processor family (known in China by the name Godson), is now in its sixth generation. The latest designs consist of the one-gigahertz, eight-core Godson 3B, the more powerful 16-core, Godson 3C (with a speed that is currently unknown), and the smaller, lower-power one-gigahertz Godson 2H, intended for netbooks and other mobile devices. The Godson 3B will be commercially available in 2011, as will the Godson 2H, but the Godson 3C won't debut until 2012.

According to Tom Halfhill, industry analyst and editor of Microprocessor Report, the eight-core Godson 3B will still be significantly less powerful than Intel's best chip, the six-core Xeon processor. It will be able to perform roughly 30 percent fewer mathematical calculations per second. Intel's forthcoming Sandy Bridge processor and AMD's Bulldozer processor will widen the gap between chips designed by American companies and the Godson 3B.

However, China's chip-making capabilities are improving quickly. Intel's Xeon processor uses a 32-nanometer process (meaning the smallest components can be formed on this scale), while the Godson 3B uses 65 nanometers, leading to significantly slower processing speeds. But the Godson 3C processor will leapfrog current technology by using a 28-nanometer process, although this will only increase its clock speed by about a factor of two, estimates Halfhill. With its eight additional cores, this should make the 3C about four times as fast as the Godson 3B.

read more here ...

http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/26596/?nlid=3693
http://www.technologyreview.com/computing/26596/?nlid=3693

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Message 10091 - Posted: 28 Oct 2010, 16:24:30 UTC

Chinese supercomputer is world’s fastest at 2.5 petaflops

China set to claim supercomputing crown - October 28, 2010

In a potential blow to US national pride the world’s fastest supercomputer is now Chinese, beating the Americans into second place for the first time since 2004 with a machine which is smaller and more energy efficient than its closest US rival.

In the run up to the release of the official list of the top 500 supercomputers next week the Chinese supercomputer, Tianhe-1A, looks certain to occupy the top spot.

Tianhe-1A, which means 'Milky Way', has clocked up 2.5 petaflops – equivalent to roughly two quadrillion (or 2.5 x 1015) calculations every second, making it significantly faster than the Cray Jaguar at Oak Ridge National Lab in Tennessee – the US’s fastest supercomputer - which can only muster a comparatively feeble 2.3 petaflops.

Jack Dongarra, a University of Tennessee computer scientist who maintains the official supercomputer rankings told the New York Times that Tianhe-1A “blows away” the competition. “We don’t close the books until Nov. 1, but I would say it is unlikely we will see a system that is faster,” he said.

Tianhe-1A, a new supercomputer revealed today at HPC 2010 China, has set a new performance record of 2.507 petaflops (quadrillion floating point operations per second), as measured by the LINPACK benchmark, making it the fastest system in China and in the world today, according to an NVIDIA statement.

The supercomputer operates 50% faster than the world’s current top supercomputer, the Cray XT5-HE Jaquar at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which can deliver 1.76 petaflops of sustained performance. The Tianhe-1A operates at one-third the power and at one half the size of the Jagquar, according to NVIDIA.

The system uses 7,168 NVIDIA Tesla M2050 massively parallel graphics processing units (GPUs) and 14,336 multi-core central processing units (CPUs). It would require more than 50,000 CPUs and twice as much floor space to deliver the same performance using CPUs alone. the company says.

Tianhe-1A was designed by the National University of Defense Technology (NUDT) in China. The system is housed at National Supercomputer Center in Tianjin and is already fully operational. It will be operated as an open access system to use for large scale scientific computations ...

read more here ...

http://blogs.nature.com/news/thegreatbeyond/2010/10/china_will_claim_supercomputin.html
http://blogs.nature.com/news/thegreatbeyond/2010/10/china_will_claim_supercomputin.html

Byron Leigh Hatch @ team Carl Sagan
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Message 10243 - Posted: 9 Nov 2010, 17:21:30 UTC - in response to Message 10066.

P ≠ NP? It's bad news for the power of computing

Has the biggest question in computer science been solved? On 6 August, Vinay Deolalikar, a mathematician at Hewlett-Packard Labs in Palo Alto, California, sent out draft copies of a paper titled simply "P ≠ NP".

This terse assertion could have profound implications for the ability of computers to solve many kinds of problem. It also answers one of the Clay Mathematics Institute's seven Millennium Prize problems, so if it turns out to be correct Deolalikar will have earned himself a prize of $1 million.

The P versus NP question concerns the speed at which a computer can accomplish a task such as factorising a number. Some tasks can be completed reasonably quickly – in technical terms, the running time is proportional to a polynomial function of the input size – and these tasks are in class P.


Hello everyone

I thought I would pass along this post by Neo over at AQUA@home here

Ah yes, that P!=NP "proof" was debunked back in August. :) There are a bunch of posts on a blog by Richard Lipton about it, along with hundreds of comments discussing the issues with the paper: http://rjlipton.wordpress.com/2010/08/15/the-p%e2%89%a0np-proof-is-one-week-old/


Best Wishes
Byron

Byron Leigh Hatch @ team Carl Sagan
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Message 10249 - Posted: 10 Nov 2010, 16:47:38 UTC



Quantum Computing Reaches for True Power



QUIBIT CHIP Four quibits are symmetrically coupled via a capacitive island, the cross in the center.
By JOHN MARKOFF
Published: November 8, 2010
New York Times


  • IBM has begun a five-year research project based on advances made in the past year at Yale University and the University of California, Santa Barbara that suggest the possibility of quantum computing based on standard microelectronics manufacturing technologies.

  • Researchers at Toshiba Research Europe and Cambridge University reported in Nature that they had fabricated light-emitting diodes coupled with a custom-formed quantum dot, which functioned as a light source for entangled photons.

  • Google has received a proposal from D-Wave and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to develop a quantum computing facility for Google next year based on D-Wave technology.


In 1981 the physicist Richard Feynman speculated about the possibility of “tiny computers obeying quantum mechanical laws.” He suggested that such a quantum computer might be the best way to simulate real-world quantum systems, a challenge that today is largely beyond the calculating power of even the fastest supercomputers.

Since then there has been sporadic progress in building this kind of computer. The experiments to date, however, have largely yielded only systems that seek to demonstrate that the principle is sound. They offer a tantalizing peek at the possibility of future supercomputing power, but only the slimmest results.

Recent progress, however, has renewed enthusiasm for finding avenues to build significantly more powerful quantum computers. Laboratory efforts in the United States and in Europe are under way using a number of technologies.

Significantly, I.B.M. has reconstituted what had recently been a relatively low-level research effort in quantum computing. I.B.M. is responding to advances made in the past year at Yale University and the University of California, Santa Barbara, that suggest the possibility of quantum computing based on standard microelectronics manufacturing technologies. Both groups layer a superconducting material, either rhenium or niobium, on a semiconductor surface, which when cooled to near absolute zero exhibits quantum behavior.

The company has assembled a large research group at its Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, N.Y., that includes alumni from the Santa Barbara and Yale laboratories and has now begun a five-year research project.

“I.B.M. is quite interested in taking up the physics which these other groups have been pioneering,” said David DiVincenzo, an I.B.M physicist and research manager.

Researchers at Santa Barbara and Yale also said that they expect to make further incremental progress in 2011 and in the next several years. At the most basic level, quantum computers are composed of quantum bits, or qubits, rather than the traditional bits that are the basic unit of digital computers. Classic computers are built with transistors that can be in either an “on” or an “off” state, representing either a 1 or a 0. A qubit, which can be constructed in different ways, can represent 1 and 0 states simultaneously. This quality is called superposition.

The potential power of quantum computing comes from the possibility of performing a mathematical operation on both states simultaneously. In a two-qubit system it would be possible to compute on four values at once, in a three-qubit system on eight at once, in a four-qubit system on 16, and so on. As the number of qubits increases, potential processing power increases exponentially.

There is, of course, a catch. The mere act of measuring or observing a qubit can strip it of its computing potential. So researchers have used quantum entanglement — in which particles are linked so that measuring a property of one instantly reveals information about the other, no matter how far apart the two particles are — to extract information. But creating and maintaining qubits in entangled states has been tremendously challenging.

“We’re at the stage of trying to develop these qubits in a way that would be like the integrated circuit that would allow you to make many of them at once,” said Rob Schoelkopf, a physicist who is leader of the Yale group. “In the next few years you’ll see operations on more qubits, but only a handful.”

The good news, he said, is that while the number of qubits is increasing only slowly, the precision with which the researchers are able to control quantum interactions has increased a thousandfold.

The Santa Barbara researchers said they believe they will essentially double the computational power of their quantum computers next year.

John Martinis, a physicist who is a member of the team, said, “We are currently designing a device with four qubits, and five resonators,” the standard microelectronic components that are used to force quantum entanglement. “If all goes well, we hope to increase this to eight qubits and nine resonators in a year or so.”

Two competing technological approaches are also being pursued. One approach involves building qubits from ions, or charged atomic particles, trapped in electromagnetic fields. Lasers are used to entangle the ions. To date, systems as large as eight qubits have been created using this method, and researchers believe that they have design ideas that will make much larger systems possible. Currently more than 20 university and corporate research laboratories are pursuing this design.

In June, researchers at Toshiba Research Europe and Cambridge University reported in Nature that they had fabricated light-emitting diodes coupled with a custom-formed quantum dot, which functioned as a light source for entangled photons. The researchers are now building more complex systems and say they can see a path to useful quantum computers.

A fourth technology has been developed by D-Wave Systems, a Canadian computer maker. D-Wave has built a system with more than 50 quantum bits, but it has been greeted skeptically by many researchers who believe that it has not proved true entanglement. Nevertheless, Hartmut Neven, an artificial-intelligence researcher at Google, said the company had received a proposal from D-Wave and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory to develop a quantum computing facility for Google next year based on the D-Wave technology.

read more here ...

Source: New York Times, Nov 8, 2010


Byron Leigh Hatch @ team Carl Sagan
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Message 10256 - Posted: 11 Nov 2010, 3:53:25 UTC

Eurek Alert!

Quantum computers a step closer to reality thanks to new finding

Quantum computers may be much easier to build than previously thought, suggests a new study in Physical Review Letters


by
Laura Gallagher
Research Media Relations Manager
Imperial College London

Quantum computers should be much easier to build than previously thought, because they can still work with a large number of faulty or even missing components, according to a study published today in Physical Review Letters. This surprising discovery brings scientists one step closer to designing and building real-life quantum computing systems – devices that could have enormous potential across a wide range of fields, from drug design, electronics, and even code-breaking.

Scientists have long been fascinated with building computers that work at a quantum level – so small that the parts are made of just single atoms or electrons. Instead of 'bits', the building blocks normally used to store electronic information, quantum systems use quantum bits or 'qubits', made up of an arrangement of entangled atoms.

Materials behave very differently at this tiny scale compared to what we are used to in our everyday lives – quantum particles, for example, can exist in two places at the same time. "Quantum computers can exploit this weirdness to perform powerful calculations, and in theory, they could be designed to break public key encryption or simulate complex systems much faster than conventional computers," said Dr Sean Barrett, the lead author of the study, who is a Royal Society University Research Fellow in the Department of Physics at Imperial College London.

The machines have been notoriously hard to build, however, and were thought to be very fragile to errors. In spite of considerable buzz in the field in the last 20 years, useful quantum computers remain elusive.

Barrett and his colleague Dr. Thomas Stace, from the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, have now found a way to correct for a particular sort of error, in which the qubits are lost from the computer altogether. They used a system of 'error-correcting' code, which involved looking at the context provided by the remaining qubits to decipher the missing information correctly.

"Just as you can often tell what a word says when there are a few missing letters, or you can get the gist of a conversation on a badly-connected phone line, we used this idea in our design for a quantum computer," said Dr Barrett. They discovered that the computers have a much higher threshold for error than previously thought – up to a quarter of the qubits can be lost – but the computer can still be made to work. "It's surprising, because you wouldn't expect that if you lost a quarter of the beads from an abacus that it would still be useful," he added.

The findings indicate that quantum computers may be much easier to build than previously thought, but as the results are still based on theoretical calculations, the next step is to actually demonstrate these ideas in the lab. Scientists will need to devise a way for scaling the computers to a sufficiently large number of qubits to be viable, says Barrett. At the moment the biggest quantum computers scientists have built are limited to just two or three qubits.

"We are still some way off from knowing what the true potential of a quantum computer might be, says Barrett. "At the moment quantum computers are good at particular tasks, but we have no idea what these systems could be used for in the future," he said. "They may not necessarily be better for everything, but we just don't know. They may be better for very specific things that we find impossible now."

read more here ...

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-11/icl-qca110910.php
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-11/icl-qca110910.php

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Message 10436 - Posted: 23 Nov 2010, 16:33:52 UTC

Singapore’s Agency - for Science - Technology - and - Research -
partners with 10 EU research organisations to work on
the groundbreaking project that lays the foundation
for creating and testing a molecular-sized processor chip.


Prof Christian Joachim
Visiting Investigator
Institute of
Materials Research and Engineering (IMRE)


Singapoe - Agency - for Science - Technology - and - Research

Singapore and European research organizations are working together to build what is essentially a single-molecule processor chip. As a comparison, a thousand of such molecular chips could fit into one of today’s microchips.

The ambitious project, termed Atomic Scale and Single Molecule Logic Gate Technologies (ATMOL), will establish a new process for making a complete molecular chip. This means that computing power can be increased significantly but take up only a small fraction of the space that is required by today’s standards.

The fabrication process involves the use of three unique ultra high vacuum (UHV) atomic scale interconnection machines which build the chip atom-by-atom. These machines physically move atoms into place one at a time at cryogenic temperatures ...

http://www.a-star.edu.sg/?TabId=828&articleType=ArticleView&articleId=1393
http://www.a-star.edu.sg/?TabId=828&articleType=ArticleView&articleId=1393

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Message 10602 - Posted: 10 Dec 2010, 18:36:32 UTC

We humans as a - multi-planetary - civilization

The SpaceX Business Plan: Help Build a Spacefaring Civilization

by Nancy Atkinson on December 9, 2010
Universe Today

Elon Musk - (born June 28, 1971) is a South African-Canadian engineer, entrepreneur and philanthropist best known for co-founding PayPal, SpaceX and Tesla) - Elon Musk - conceded that the space business world is an extraordinarily difficult place to make money. But that isn’t his main priority anyway. “The reason I’m doing SpaceX,” Musk said during the Falcon 9/Dragon post-flight press conference, “is that I just happen to have a very strong passion for space and I want us to become true spacefaring civilization and even a multi-planetary civilization. That is my goal for SpaceX.” ...

http://www.universetoday.com/81570/the-spacex-business-plan-help-build-a-spacefaring-civilization/
http://www.universetoday.com/81570/the-spacex-business-plan-help-build-a-spacefaring-civilization/



SpaceX's Elon Musk with the Falcon rocket. Credit: SpaceX



The interior configuration of the Dragon capsule. Credit: SpaceX

Byron Leigh Hatch @ team Carl Sagan
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Message 10634 - Posted: 14 Dec 2010, 19:31:28 UTC - in response to Message 10078.

Interesting stuff!

thank you Slicker and hello

I Wish you much success with your project Collatz Conjecture
I'm happy to be able to contribute a few spare CPU cycles to Collatz Conjecture
Best Wishes
Byron

Some more ... Science and Technology in the News :)


IBM to build 3 petaflop supercomputer for Germany

by
Joab Jackson

Germany’s Bavarian Academy of Science has announced that it has contracted IBM to build a “SuperMUC” supercomputer that, when completed in 2012, will be able to execute up to 3 petaflops, potentially making it the world’s most powerful supercomputer ...

read more here ...

http://www.goodgearguide.com.au/article/371191/ibm_build_3_petaflop_supercomputer_germany/
http://www.goodgearguide.com.au/article/371191/ibm_build_3_petaflop_supercomputer_germany/



Chinese supercomputer is world’s fastest at 2.5 petaflops

China set to claim supercomputing crown - October 28, 2010

In a potential blow to US national pride the world’s fastest supercomputer is now Chinese, beating the Americans into second place for the first time since 2004 with a machine which is smaller and more energy efficient than its closest US rival.

In the run up to the release of the official list of the top 500 supercomputers next week the Chinese supercomputer, Tianhe-1A, looks certain to occupy the top spot

...

The system uses 7,168 NVIDIA Tesla M2050 massively parallel graphics processing units (GPUs) and 14,336 multi-core central processing units (CPUs). It would require more than 50,000 CPUs and twice as much floor space to deliver the same performance using CPUs alone. the company says.

Tianhe-1A was designed by the National University of Defense Technology (NUDT) in China. The system is housed at National Supercomputer Center in Tianjin and is already fully operational. It will be operated as an open access system to use for large scale scientific computations ...

read more here ...

http://blogs.nature.com/news/thegreatbeyond/2010/10/china_will_claim_supercomputin.html
http://blogs.nature.com/news/thegreatbeyond/2010/10/china_will_claim_supercomputin.html

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Message 10637 - Posted: 14 Dec 2010, 22:04:14 UTC - in response to Message 10634.

IBM to build 3 petaflop supercomputer for Germany

Chinese supercomputer is world’s fastest at 2.5 petaflops

Last time I checked, Collatz was running at about 6 petaflops. I'm pretty sure it is higher now. If you think if it as a giant distributed computer, then we already have them beat!

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Message 11142 - Posted: 25 Jan 2011, 23:09:10 UTC - in response to Message 10637.

IBM to build 3 petaflop supercomputer for Germany

Chinese supercomputer is world’s fastest at 2.5 petaflops

Last time I checked, Collatz was running at about 6 petaflops. I'm pretty sure it is higher now. If you think if it as a giant distributed computer, then we already have them beat!


That's awesome, but then again this is just crazy to look at: http://boincstats.com/stats/project_graph.php?pr=bo
What the free people of the free world can accomplish when they are all united... under boinc.

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Message 11486 - Posted: 16 Feb 2011, 15:58:58 UTC

Superconducting quantum integrated circuit
may lead to future quantum computational architecture


Adapted from materials provided by UC Santa Barbara
February 16, 2011 by Editor of: kurzweilai.net


An important milestone toward the realization of a large-scale quantum computer, and further demonstration of a new level of the quantum control of light, were accomplished by a team of scientists at UC Santa Barbara and in China and Japan.

The study, published in the Feb. 7 issue of the journal Physical Review Letters, involved scientists from Zhejiang University, China, and NEC Corporation, Japan. The experimental effort was pursued in the research groups of UCSB physics professors Andrew Cleland and John Martinis.

The team described how they used a superconducting quantum integrated circuit to generate unique quantum states of light known as “NOON” states. These states, generated from microwave frequency photons, the quantum unit of light, were created and stored in two physically-separated microwave storage cavities, explained first author Haohua Wang, postdoctoral fellow in physics at UCSB. The quantum NOON states were created using one, two, or three photons, with all the photons in one cavity, leaving the other cavity empty. This was simultaneous with the first cavity being empty, with all the photons stored in the second cavity.

“This seemingly impossible situation, allowed by quantum mechanics, led to interesting results when we looked inside the cavities,” said second author Matteo Mariantoni, postdoctoral fellow in physics at UCSB. “There was a 50 percent chance of seeing all the photons in one cavity, and a 50 percent chance of not finding any –– in which case all the photons could always be found in the other cavity.”

However, if one of the cavities was gently probed before looking inside, thus changing the quantum state, the effect of the probing could be seen, even if that cavity was subsequently found to be empty, he added.

“It’s kind of like the states are ghostly twins or triplets,” said Wang. “They are always together, but somehow you never know where they are. They also have a mysterious way of communicating, so they always seem to know what is going to happen.” Indeed, these types of states display what Einstein famously termed, “spooky action at a distance,” where prodding or measuring a quantum state in one location affects its behavior elsewhere.

The quantum integrated circuit, which includes superconducting quantum bits in addition to the microwave storage cavities, forms part of what eventually may become a quantum computational architecture.


read more here ...

http://www.kurzweilai.net/superconducting-quantum-integrated-circuit-may-be-future-may-become-a-quantum-computational-architecture
http://www.kurzweilai.net/superconducting-quantum-integrated-circuit-may-be-future-may-become-a-quantum-computational-architecture

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Message 12640 - Posted: 1 Aug 2011, 16:40:39 UTC

Hello Collatz Conjecture friends and neighbors

any of these Science and Technology stories catch your eye ?????

Everyone ... please feel free to post a comment in this thread ... or rant and rave ... or what ever :) - nothing is off the topic ... the more the merry ;)

OK ... let's start posting!

Science and Technology in the News for:

Monday August 1, 2011

NEWS AND BLOG HEADLINES


any of these Science and Technology stories catch your eye ?????

Everyone ... please feel to post a comment in this thread ... or rant and rave ... or what ever :) - nothing is off the topic ... the more the merry ;)

OK ... let's start posting!

or happy reading :)


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